Book Reviews by Kids

Read reviews by kids, and check out best sellers and award winners!

The Children of the King by Sonya Hartnett

Reviewed by Nicole Cooper, age 11, Urbana, Illinois

It is too dangerous to stay in London. The threat of bombs falling overhead is constant, and now that France has fallen, Cecily’s parents are getting worried. So they decide to send Cecily and her brother Jeremy (along with their mother) to their Uncle Peregrine’s house until it’s “safe” enough. Although Cecily is perfectly happy… read more »


Counting by 7s by Holly Goldberg Sloan

Reviewed by Isabel Folger, age 12, Santa Cruz, California

Twelve-year-old Willow Chance, who is fascinated by and knowledgeable about plants and medical conditions, has enough to deal with starting a new middle school with no friends and being accused of cheating on an important test before her parents die in a car crash. She soon finds that not only her world is changed after… read more »


Matched by Ally Condie

Reviewed by Kira Householder, age 12, Scottsdale, Arizona

Part of leading your own, individual life is choosing whom you love and where you work. Imagine how drab and strict life would be if someone controlled that and decided when you died. If there is even one rebellious bone in your body, you probably would have despised a life like that. You cannot call… read more »


18 Things by Jamie Ayres

Reviewed by Kaylee Ayres, age 13, Cape Coral, Florida

Jamie Ayres has written an inspiring story about over coming grief. In 18 Things, teenager Olga Gay Worontzoff suffers through depression after her best friend since kindergarten is fatally struck by lightning on their sailing trip. Olga feels responsible for his death, and that lie leads her to swallow an entire bottle of pain pills…. read more »


Below by Meg McKinlay

Reviewed by Sundari Arunarasu, age 11, Portland, Oregon

Anyone would think that if you drowned a town with five thousand swimming pools of water, it would be done and gone, forgotten forever! But twelve-year-old Cassie knows that everything has a way of revealing itself, sooner or later. Since she was a little girl, Cassie was always interested in the town that the mayor,… read more »


Sugar by Jewell Parker Rhodes

Reviewed by Sonia Patel Banker, age 9, San Francisco, California

Ten-year-old Sugar lives on the River Road Plantation in Mississippi in the early 1800s. Sugar is a young African-American girl whose father died during the Civil War and whose mother died of sickness shortly after. As Sugar spends her time cutting cane, Mister Wills, the plantation owner, hires more cane workers from China. These men… read more »


Al Capone Shines My Shoes by Gennifer Choldenko

Reviewed by Jacob Zacks, age 11, Herzyllia Pituach, Israel

Though I am fascinated with American history, including Alcatraz, I was drawn to the book Al Capone Shines My Shoes, by Gennifer Choldenko, for different reasons. The main character’s name is Moose, a nickname that I have been called for years. He has an autistic sister. After reading a review in Stone Soup by Richard… read more »


The Lions of Little Rock by Kristin Levine

Reviewed by Pamela Picerno, age 13, Metuchen, New Jersey

Have you ever read a book where you’re able to relate so much to the main character that it’s creepy? The Lions of Little Rock made me feel exactly that way. It’s 1958, and Marlee Nisbett is a twelve-year-old girl in Little Rock, Arkansas. She is extremely shy and won’t talk to anyone except her… read more »


The Million Dollar Putt by Dan Gutman

Reviewed by Shenna He, age 12, Burnaby, British Columbia

If you happen to be walking along the shelves in the library and it’s a rainy afternoon and you’re looking for a short but enchanting story, then The Million Dollar Putt, by Dan Gutman, is for you. Dan Gutman has made the life of a blind kid realistic, not to the point that you’re bewildered… read more »


Kizzy Ann Stamps by Jeri Watts

Reviewed by Autumn Owens, age 11, Bryan, Ohio

Kizzy Ann Stamps is a normal girl. She has a dog named Shag. She lives on a farm with her mother, father, and brother. But there’s one catch to this whole “normal girl” business: Kizzy Ann is black. Today, that wouldn’t be a problem. However, in Kizzy’s time of 1963, being black would have been a huge… read more »